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Posts Tagged ‘design’

Easter BuntingThis Easter Sunday we spent some time in the morning making Easter bunting to decorate the house for lunch.

To make your own Easter bunting you will need:

1) Easter eggs printed on thick card stock – draw or download your own

2) Coloured pencils, crayons and textas

3) Small paper hole punch (or a needle or similar)

4) Scissors

5) Brown twine

Step 1) Colour in the eggs. We coloured in a total of 32 eggs.

Easter BuntingStep 2) Use scissors to cut out the eggs.

Easter BuntingStep 3) Decide the order you would like to have your eggs placed on the twine, using contrasting colours and patterns.Easter BuntingStep 4) Punch two small holes in the top of each egg.Easter BuntingStep 5) Thread each egg with twine.Easter BuntingStep 6) Attach your Easter bunting to the wall with masking tape.Easter BuntingHappy Easter x

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I love to scanThere are many tools I use in my creative endeavors, but perhaps the most overlooked, yet indispensable, is my scanner. This simple, inexpensive machine allows me to scan old photographs at high resolution, create digital copies of my children’s artwork and bring new digital life to those amazing thrift shop fabric finds. These past few months I’ve become seriously addicted to scanning, and now officially declare it my number one creative tool of choice. There’s a world of possibility out there. My new motto is: If it’s flat, it can be scanned.

If you’re after scanning inspiration, please check out my latest Slideshare offering under my alter ego Make Great below.

Go forth and scan.

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Make Great

Last month I took the plunge and started a self-hosted blog on presentation design to compliment my professional work. I’d love you to pop by for a visit at makegreat.com.au.

Starting a self-hosted blog has been quite a learning curve. Here are a few of my thoughts:

  • It’s great to have a proper website address and building it up this way gives you loads of new skills.
  • You have much more control over the aesthetic elements of your blog…but there’s a huge amount of technical skills required to achieve even the smallest things (thank goodness for my husband).
  • It’s quite a lonesome world outside the wordpress community, with no ready-made audience to embrace you!
  • It’s been a juggling act wearing two blogging hats and trying to switch hats when commenting on different blogs. So for the most part I haven’t been commenting but have still very much enjoyed reading everyone’s blog updates in my reader!

BookI’m still on my journey and Make Great is a long way off looking the way I want it to look. I would definitely recommend The Creative Person’s Website Builder by Alannah Moore if it’s something you’re considering.

If you’re interested in presentation design or just like to look at animal pictures, I’ve uploaded my first slide deck to Slideshare and have had a surge of views thanks to the very kind endorsement of Chiara at Tweak your Slides. I’ve included my slide deck at the end of this post.

Oh and there will be more Roar Sweetly posts coming soon!

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When Lego announced its controversial Friends range earlier this year, this 1970s Lego advertisement went viral. It featured a young girl in jeans and a blue t-shirt proudly displaying her free-form lego construction. Who knew girls could play with blocks that weren’t pink?!

With all the Lego activity that’s been happening in our home, we stumbled upon this extraordinary website for spare parts called Brick Link. It’s an unofficial Lego marketplace, or as I like to think of it…eBay for Lego. On this website you can purchase just about anything relating to Lego including rare missing parts and old Lego kits from as early as the 1960s.

Some of the old Lego imagery is beautiful in its simplicity. Here’s a selection of my favourites, alongside their contemporary counterparts.

Lego House: 1970 and 2011

Lego Police Headquarters: 1976 and 2011

Lego Fire Station: 1970 and 2011

Lego Aeroplane: 1974 and 2010

Lego Truck: 1967 and 2010

Someone could write a thesis on how Lego reflects changing trends in our society.

Though I think I’d rather build it.

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Dioramas have a school project loveliness about them and are wonderfully tactile in this digital age.  I’ve been meaning to make a construction site for my son for some time now and was motivated again after organising his toys and seeing all his little yellow diggers together. This project is easy to make and came in at a grand total of $0.00 as I sourced all my materials from around the house and yard. Here’s a step by step guide:

Materials

  1. Large cardboard box
  2. Garbage bag
  3. Stanley knife / scissors
  4. Tape and glue
  5. Blue paint + brush
  6. Several printed sheets of rocks and other construction materials
  7. A sheet of white paper
  8. A couple kilos of slightly damp sand
  9. Small assortment of rocks, paddle-pop sticks, bark etc
  10. Building site accessories and signs
  11. Yellow diggers

Instructions

  1. Cut the box on each side diagonally from the top back corner to approximately 10 cm (4″) above the bottom front corner. Cut along the front and remove this portion of the box so that it resembles a stage.
  2. Paint the inside walls of the box a sky blue colour.
  3. Cut a plastic garbage bag to size and secure firmly to the base of the diorama with tape, making the bottom of the box water resistant.
  4. Cut out white clouds from a sheet of paper and glue to the blue sky.
  5. Glue the construction site imagery around the bottom inside wall of the diorama.
  6. Fill the box with a layer of slightly damp sand and pat smooth.
  7. Arrange accessories and diggers on sand.

This diorama was loads of fun to make and a big hit with my son. The possibilities are endless; zoo, farm, space station, jurassic…

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Recently I have become interested in design. I love that this blog gives me the opportunity to play around with photography and layout, though my technical skills leave a lot to be desired.

Last week I bought a book called Thou Shall Not Use Comic Sans: 365 Graphic Design Commandments by Sean Adams, Peter Dawson, John Foster and Tony Seddon. The book, which is written by industry insiders, outlines 365 commandments for graphic design in a lighthearted manner. These commandments fall under six categories namely typography, layout, colour, imagery, print and the practice of design. Some of the commandments are basic and intuitive, while others are quite technical.

Here’s my top ten:

  1. Thou shall not use Microsoft Word for layouts
  2. Thou shall periodically check a printed copy rather than viewing a layout on screen
  3. Thou shall archive meticulously at all times
  4. Thou shall not use photoshop filters to disguise a low quality image
  5. Thou shall think of white space as a colour and use it positively
  6. Thou shall use layers to organise type, colour and imagery
  7. Thou shall accept that Times New Roman has its uses
  8. Thou shall not add two spaces after a full stop
  9. Thou shall triple check your document size before you start your layout
  10. Thou shall learn the rules before you break them

I love the layout of this book.  I think it’s a great resource for the novice designer and easy to read if you’re time-poor.

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