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Archive for the ‘Lego’ Category

At the risk of sounding like a crazy Lego lady, here is another Lego-related post which will appeal to those people that love to organise.

Since the Lego revolution took off at our place we’ve been keeping all our Lego in one big ol’ plastic tub. This was causing my husband and son no end of frustration as it would take them forever to find an elusive piece lurking in the nook of another piece. I googled Lego storage and was amazed by the number of people who were obsessed with finding the perfect sorting and storage system. I was most inspired by Jen over at I Heart Organising. She uses the Ikea Trofast system for sorting and storing their Lego pieces. I decided to use the Trofast storage system, but with different labels aimed at a younger child. I wanted visual, easily-identifiable labels so that my 3-yeard old could be responsible for sorting and packing away his own Lego.

So here goes:

You will need

2 x white Ikea Trofast frames + 12 small Trofast storage drawers with lids.

Cutting board, ruler and stanley knife/scissors.

Small roll of contact paper.

Assorted paint chips from a hardware store in the colour of your Lego pieces.

A colour print-out with 2 x Lego logos and imagery of lego accessories (my printable here).

A small white label with the word Instructions printed on it.

Instructions

1. Assemble Trofast frames and wipe clean the exterior surface of storage drawers with a damp cloth and dry (this will assist with contact paper adhering to the surface.

2. Decide how you would like to categorise your Lego collection. We sorted into Baseplates, Instructions, Minifigures + Accessories, Wheels + Vehicle Windows, Yellow, Green, Red, Blue, White, Grey, Black and Orange / Beige / Maroon / Brown pieces.

3. Source Lego logo + label imagery and insert onto an A4 sheet for colour printing (or use Lego Organisation Labels). I sized and cropped my Lego logos to approx 9 x 5cms and the drawer panels to approx 10 x 6cms. You will also need a separate written label for the Instructions drawer.

4. Using a cutting board and ruler, cut the logos, colour paint chips and imagery to size.

5. For the drawer with the Orange / Beige / Maroon / Brown pieces I cut colour paint chips to size and then divided them into four and stuck a piece from each colour together with tape before placing onto contact paper.

6. Cut pieces of contact paper into rectangular panels slighter larger in size to the colour panel. My contact panels were approximately half a centimetre larger than the colour panel around the diameter.

7. Peel off contact backing and carefully place paper labels onto sticky side, then adhere labels onto the drawers.

8. Sit back and enjoy your handiwork!
Oh and it also creates a handy little display for all those wonderful Lego creations.

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My son has been obsessed with Lego for a few months now. Most of his constructions have been via his personal Lego Monkey. This morning, at a month shy of 3-years, he spent 10 minutes quietly in his bedroom before emerging to display his first independent Lego construction, undirected and unassisted.

Oh and not to state the obvious…it’s a moon buggy.

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When Lego announced its controversial Friends range earlier this year, this 1970s Lego advertisement went viral. It featured a young girl in jeans and a blue t-shirt proudly displaying her free-form lego construction. Who knew girls could play with blocks that weren’t pink?!

With all the Lego activity that’s been happening in our home, we stumbled upon this extraordinary website for spare parts called Brick Link. It’s an unofficial Lego marketplace, or as I like to think of it…eBay for Lego. On this website you can purchase just about anything relating to Lego including rare missing parts and old Lego kits from as early as the 1960s.

Some of the old Lego imagery is beautiful in its simplicity. Here’s a selection of my favourites, alongside their contemporary counterparts.

Lego House: 1970 and 2011

Lego Police Headquarters: 1976 and 2011

Lego Fire Station: 1970 and 2011

Lego Aeroplane: 1974 and 2010

Lego Truck: 1967 and 2010

Someone could write a thesis on how Lego reflects changing trends in our society.

Though I think I’d rather build it.

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