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Archive for the ‘Craft’ Category

Easter BuntingThis Easter Sunday we spent some time in the morning making Easter bunting to decorate the house for lunch.

To make your own Easter bunting you will need:

1) Easter eggs printed on thick card stock – draw or download your own

2) Coloured pencils, crayons and textas

3) Small paper hole punch (or a needle or similar)

4) Scissors

5) Brown twine

Step 1) Colour in the eggs. We coloured in a total of 32 eggs.

Easter BuntingStep 2) Use scissors to cut out the eggs.

Easter BuntingStep 3) Decide the order you would like to have your eggs placed on the twine, using contrasting colours and patterns.Easter BuntingStep 4) Punch two small holes in the top of each egg.Easter BuntingStep 5) Thread each egg with twine.Easter BuntingStep 6) Attach your Easter bunting to the wall with masking tape.Easter BuntingHappy Easter x

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Easter Art

Easter Art This Easter it’s been pouring with rain, so we have kept busy with some indoor activities. This morning we did some Easter art with cut up vegetables. Halved carrots dipped in yellow paint make some rather adorable Easter chicks. When the paint is dry, use some texta markers to add beaks, eyes and legs.Easter ArtHalved potatoes are the perfect shape for Easter eggs. Draw on some decorative effects when the paint has dried.

Easter ArtIt’s much more fun than paint brushes!Easter Art

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I love to scanThere are many tools I use in my creative endeavors, but perhaps the most overlooked, yet indispensable, is my scanner. This simple, inexpensive machine allows me to scan old photographs at high resolution, create digital copies of my children’s artwork and bring new digital life to those amazing thrift shop fabric finds. These past few months I’ve become seriously addicted to scanning, and now officially declare it my number one creative tool of choice. There’s a world of possibility out there. My new motto is: If it’s flat, it can be scanned.

If you’re after scanning inspiration, please check out my latest Slideshare offering under my alter ego Make Great below.

Go forth and scan.

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2014 Christmas Card We are huge fans of awkward family Christmas photos. You can go here and here for inspiration. Over the past few years we’ve strived to achieve our own little measure of awkwardness at Chrissy time. I’ve always felt a bit shy to share these on the blog, but have a devil-may-care attitude this year. Cheesy Christmas cards are fun to do even though they’re a lot more effort than you’d imagine. My tips are to wear matching outfits, use a camera with a tripod / timer or take individual shots and crop and position the images into a collage. This year’s creative effort involved reindeers – which are a huge deal in the world of three year olds – and my newly acquired photoshop skills.2014 Chirstmas CardLast year we dressed up as life-sized presents. We were way too big and boxy to fit in the same shot so instead we achieved a nice effect by taking individual photos against a plain white wall and creating a simple collage. Christmas Card 2013Our inaugural effort in 2013 involved matching outfits with iron-on transfer mistletoe. Husband grew a mo and we put our scratchy cat into a Santa suit. It was impossible to get everyone looking and smiling at the same time, so we let them just do their thing and I loved the way it ended up. Who said ‘never work with animals or children’?!2012 Christmas Card

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A Particular Shade of Blue There’s a lot of fun you can have with a tester pot of paint from a hardware store. This particular blue is called Dulux Tropical Haven and it has a great retro look about it. I used it to revamp a few plain wooden items including a foot stool, rolling pin and old cigar box turned jewellery box. I put a light spray of clear gloss over the finished paint to seal and harden it. It really is a cheap and cheerful way to give everyday items a new lease on life.

Dulux Tropical Haven

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Vintage Sacrilege [ˈvin-tij ˈsa-krə-lij]

n.

1. The violation or injurious treatment of a mint-condition vintage item.

I love all things vintage, however it’s recently occurred to me that some of the behaviour I exhibit towards my vintage collection may be a little less than admirable. Today, in the spirit of honesty, I reveal my top six acts of vintage sacrilege.

1. Cutting up vintage sheets to make fabric tape for gift wrapping.Fabric Tape

2. Ordering vintage Thunderbird 3 online for my son to tear open the packaging and use as a…toy. Vintage Thunderbird

3. Drilling holes into the bottom of tin kettles to convert into plant holders.

Vintage Kettles

4. Bedecking my toddlers’ beds in beautiful vintage quilt sets (not injurious but high risk).Vintage Childrens Bedding5. Dismembering vintage atlases in the name of craft.

Vintage Atlas Hearts

6. Dismembering vintage dictionaries, and other vintage books, in the name of craft. Vintage Book CraftThere…I’ve fessed up.

My deepest apologies to any lovers of vintage offended by this post.

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Five Ways with Lilly PilliesLilly Pilly TreeDown our street and around the corner is a rather majestic Lilly Pilly tree, whose branches hang over a little lane-way.  Many Lilly Pilly trees are native to the East Coast of Australia and carry striking pink edible fruit. This vitamin-C rich fruit formed part of the diet of coastal Aboriginal communities. The fruit is quite acidic and tangy…I would describe it as being similar to a not-yet-ripe green apple with the texture of crisp watermelon. I’m surprised that my children snack on the fruit straight from the tree, undeterred by the sourness. While eating native foods is becoming much more common in Australia, it’s still not very widespread. Given the overabundance of this little native fruit in our lives recently, I’m pleased to present my top five ways with lilly pillies.

1) A native substitute for fresh flowers.Lilly Pillies in a Vase

2) Lilly Pilly Smoothie. Pictured below is two freshly juiced organic apples, a small organic banana and a cup of pitted lilly pillies blitzed in the food processor.

Lilly Pilly Smoothie

3) Table Decor. A sprig of lilly pilly tied with brown twine to a white cloth napkin.Lilly Pilly Table Napkin

4) Lilly Pilly Muffins. I adapted Donna Hay’s recipe for Blueberry Muffins to make the Lilly Pilly Muffins pictured below.DSC03833Lilly Pilly Muffins

5) The way nature intended…from the tree to the mouth.Toddler holding Lilly Pillies

A note on cooking with lilly pillies

If you’re planning to eat and/or cook with Lilly Pillies, please note that there is a hard little seed in the centre of the fruit, pictured here.
Lilly Pilly Seed
It’s easy to remove the seed by squashing the berry between your fingers. The prepped lilly pillies should look something like this.Pitted Lilly Pillies
This image shows diced lilly pillies in muffin batter. Cooking the lilly pillies makes them sweeter and more palatable.Lilly Pilly Muffin Batter
This NAIDOC week embrace some lilly pillies into your life!

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The Sweetest Gift WrapGiftwrap1This is a lovely way to incorporate your children’s artwork into a gift. Wrap gift in brown paper and twine. Use a heart-shaped paper punch to create shapes from artwork. Use glue (or much-loved sticker making machine) to adhere heart-shaped artwork to package.

Tools pictured below.

Tools of the trade

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Vintage Cushion CoversVintage fabric makes me swoon. This fabric comes from a set of old curtains that I discovered in an op-shop. Beautiful condition, virtually unused…be still my heart. I wanted to use the fabric to make up some new cushion covers for our sofa. I used the old cushion covers as a template and followed the zipper tutorial here.  It felt so good to dust off the sewing machine and do some craft again.

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Crafting for a BlokeThis month I was inspired by the beautiful little creations over at Life Outside Mainstream to try some Iron-On Transfer craft for my husband’s birthday. He has a fondness for retro/defunct logos and I was able to source this Kodak logo to iron onto a grey T-shirt. It was very easy to do. The t-shirt has already had one wash in the machine and is showing a bit of wear on the transfer. I think it adds to to the ‘vintage’ look, but we’ll see how this goes over time. To create a unique t-shirt, all you need is good quality iron-on transfer paper (for dark clothing) and a colour inkjet printer. Instructions are on the pack. Iron-On Transfer

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